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Sooper Drupal Themes: Introducing 4 Theme Designs, 5 Glazed Builder Features And New Portfolio Tools

Thu, 2017-11-16 13:31

We're super excited for you to have 4 smoking hot new designs as well as some awesome improvements to our Drupal 7 products! Our updates our available for download immediately!

4 Hot New Theme Designs

With our Drupal 8 development nearing completion we're making sure all our designs are looking their best and are ready for prime-time. SooperThemes is all about empowering users with top notch design and we produced 4 smoking hot new demos for Photography, (Drupal) Agency, App, and Marketing Agency websites.

Photography Drupal Theme Demo Photography Studio Homepage Photo Portfolio Homepage Minimal Gallery Homepage Material Design Portfolio Homepage Coverbox Homepage Full Screen Slider Homepage App Drupal Theme Demo App FAQ App Showcase View App Team and Testomonials iPhone X Mockup With Text (Drupal) Agency Drupal Theme Demo Agency Homepage Portfolio Features Services / Solutions About Us Marketing Agency Drupal Theme Demo Marketing Home Marketing Services About Us Showcase Gallery 5 New Glazed Builder Features Gradient Design Tool For Stunning Section Backgrounds

Design stunning, layered backgrounds for your sections without photoshop! All the beautiful multi-colored sections in our new App demo were made with Glazed Builder. Our gradient tool supports color transparency which means you can create stunning gradients and then blend them with patterns or photography to create mesmerizing designs. If it's your job to create engaging landing pages your job is now easier with Glazed Builder. 

We Listened: New Button To Add Sections Anywhere In Your Page

When landing pages get very long dragging new sections from the top of the page can become tedious. You complained and we listened! A popular request was to make the main Glazed Builder controls float and follow along with you when scrolling down the page. However, this solution can cause conflicts with other controls, and can become confusing when using nested Glazed Container. Instead we designed a new solution that is both clear and effective:  

Save Precious Time With Single Click Inline Editing

Glazed Builder is all about getting things done fast and with ease. Previously inline editing required 1 click to initialize the editor and a second click to place the cursor where you want to start typing. From now on the first click is not needed any more and you can click and type directly, saving you precious milliseconds and providing a more intuitive editing experience! 

Using External Images in Glazed Builder

Thanks to the fully featured media library integration managing images in Glazed Builder was already a great experience. However, we have now exposed the image url on all image widgets in Glazed Builder so that you can directly reference external images, without needing to import them to your media library. 

Vertical Centering Option On Sections

Sections already had a full width option and a full height option. We added a vertical centering option. Vertical centering was already possible using padding but since full height sections with centered text are now a popular design pattern we decided to add this option that makes a good companion to the already existing settings for full width and 100% height.

CMS Portfolio Module Revamped And New Module To Be Announced Tomorrow

For the production of our Photography demo we launched many new capabilities in our portfolio modules. The Glazed CMS Portfolio module previous offered just 2 displaying images: stacked images and thumbnails that link to a lightbox. We needed this component to be more flexible so that we can customize image display for different use cases. The result is a fusion between field formatters, views, and our portfolio images field. You can now use views to format the image field in portfolio pages. Furthermore, you can select any field formatter and view on a per-node basis as well. Our photography demo has a complete dropdown menu showcasing different variations (It's the Gallery Pages dropdown).

On top of that, we have dropped the MD Portfolio module from our products and wrote a new module from scratch for both Drupal 7 and 8. This new module is called SooperThemes Portfolio and will be the topic of another blog post tomorrow! If you're looking to update your website and it uses our portfolio modules it's recommended to wait for tomorrow's blog post.

As always, see our changelogs in the documentation section for a more complete list of changes and feel welcome to give us feedback in the comments! For bug reports please use our support forum.

Categories: Drupal

roomify.us: Announcing BAT for Drupal 8

Thu, 2017-11-16 11:29
The best open-source booking system builder is now available for the world-class Drupal 8 CMS.
Categories: Drupal

Elevated Third: WATCH Elevated 3 Takeaways: Website Launch

Thu, 2017-11-16 11:26
WATCH Elevated 3 Takeaways: Website Launch WATCH Elevated 3 Takeaways: Website Launch Joe Flores Thu, 11/16/2017 - 11:26

In this edition of 3 Takeaways, Joe Flores, Senior Drupal Developer, answers the question, "what happens during website launch?" From quality assurance to setting the domain name, this video clears things up. 

 

 

Hi everybody. My name is Joe Flores, I’m one of the senior developers here at Elevated Third and I’m here to talk to you about your website launch.

Website launch is the culmination of the entire design and dev process and there is a lot riding on the success of this part of the project. There are so many things that can go wrong during launch and here’s what we do to make sure things go as smooth as possible.

Takeaway #1: How launch is different from development

We’re not actually creating code. We are assuming the content of the website is finished and that there will be no major structural changes. This is to ensure that there are no conflicts between the dev server and live. At this point, we are assuming that content changes will only happen on the live website.

Takeaway #2: Configuration and testing

During the launch process your website will be moving on to a new server with more memory and storage space that we configure for security and speed. So we do things like changing admin password, enabling caching, disabling development workflow modules, and configuring marketing automation rules. We do all of this to make sure no one sees an unfinished product. So then, we perform one final QA to make sure everything is running.

Takeaway #3: The actual launch

We spend on average 2 days doing all this stuff to make sure launch is the easiest part of the process. By this point, we caught all big errors and ensured the site is secure. So all this part involves is setting the domain name. We did all the front loading to make sure the launch is smooth and this process only takes a couple of hours.

And that is your 3 takeaways for website launch.

Categories: Drupal

Acro Media: Acro Media offering $4000 tuition subsidy towards College’s new Certificate

Thu, 2017-11-16 09:32

As one of North America’s premier users of Drupal we have worked together with Okanagan College to develop a new Drupal Web Developer Certificate that will be offered weekday evenings beginning January 8, 2018.

We are so anxious to find coding talent that we are putting our own money on the line in hopes of addressing our HR recruitment challenges.

“We need great candidates for interesting and exciting CMS work in Kelowna and are looking forward to hiring graduates from this program,” says Shae Inglis, CEO of Acro Media. “In fact, Acro Media is going beyond just supporting the OC program. We are also sponsoring a contest to provide a $4,000 tuition award to a talented student who submits the best code sample before Dec. 15 for the January intake of the course. Contest details are available at www.acromedia.com/contest

“The Drupal Web Developer Certificate will give students the knowledge, practice and experience to find great jobs and careers in the Okanagan. This exciting Okanagan College and industry partnership has resulted in a program that will provide companies with highly qualified and work-ready graduates,” explains Dennis Silvestrone, Okanagan College’s Director of Continuing Studies and Corporate Training.

Taught by industry experts, this 240-hour Certificate will be offered at the Okanagan Innovation Centre in downtown Kelowna Mondays through Thursdays from 4:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Students applying for the Drupal Web Developer Certificate are financial aid and student loan eligible.

For more information visit www.okanagan.bc.ca/drupal or call 1-888-638-0058 to learn more about qualifying for this Certificate.

Categories: Drupal

Flocon de toile | Freelance Drupal: Change configuration directly on a Drupal 8 production site

Thu, 2017-11-16 06:00
Managing native configuration with Drupal 8 makes it very easy to make changes or additions to the configuration from a site instance (such as a development environment) to another site instance (the production environment). These configuration exports and imports of a site are made in one piece: that is, the entire configuration of a site, which is updated. Thus if configuration additions have been made to the production site, they will be overwritten at the next import of the configuration if these configurations are not present also on the source environment. But there are valid use cases where certain configurations can and must be modified directly in production. Examples of immediate use are, for example, the creation of new Webform forms, or the creation or update of new Newsletters managed with the SimpleNews module. It is quite legitimate for a webmaster to modify or create new NewsLetters on the production site. It's almost like content, except that ... it's a configuration entity. Let's discover how to manage these particular cases with the module Configuration split, module that will allow us to maintain an organized process to manage the evolution and maintenance of a site in production while allowing the modification of some configurations live.
Categories: Drupal

Dropsolid: ngrok: testing payment gateways in Drupal commerce

Thu, 2017-11-16 01:15
16 Nov Testing payment gateways in Drupal commerce: ngrok to the rescue Marek Drupal 8 Tech

Building commerce websites always means building integrations. Every time we work on project that is aimed at selling something (products, subscriptions, paid access, etc.), we have to choose a payment provider that will take care of our transactions.

Almost every payment provider out there gives us the ability to test their services using some sort of testing or sandbox environment. This is a nice chance to fully test the checkout funnel and avoid stressful situations when deploying the application to a live environment.

While setting up commerce checkout flow locally, you’ll probably run into one (or all) of the following hiccups:

  • Issues with setting up a payments provider account,
  • No ability to parse incoming webhooks,
  • Problems with redirecting your customers back to the website.


The reason is simple: you’re hidden behind your NAT/firewall, so there is no way to reach your website from any remote server. As a workaround, you could probably create a manual payment method (for example bank transfer) and use this to browse all steps of your checkout flow. But you'll have to admit: this won't solve your main problem. Alternatively, you could clone your project to a remote environment, but is this always necessary? There has to be a better way to save time and keep working locally whilst keeping the full ability to test and debug remote services. Let’s have a closer look at how to wrap it all together with Drupal 8, Commerce 2 and a small tool called ngrok. In this example, I will be using the Mollie payments platform - scroll down to find out more! (Additional info about how to use Mollie and Drupal together in this post)

 

Download and set up ngrok

Ngrok is a very simple command line tool that allows you to expose a local web server to the internet. It takes only a few moments to set it up and its variety of configuration options is quite impressive (see the corresponding documentation).
 

Create ngrok account and download library files

Three easy steps:

  1. Simply visit ngrok.io and create a new account: https://dashboard.ngrok.com/user/signup
  2. Download and unpack the ngrok binary: https://ngrok.com/download
  3. Install your authtoken. Your personal account comes with its own token, which is available for reference via this link: https://dashboard.ngrok.com/get-started

When you get your token, locate the ngrok file and run the following command:

# ./ngrok {command} {param_is_a_token_conaining_lot_of_strange_chars_like_3Adacx$$321!} ./ngrok authtoken 5RpgRe8UA4qFWXtZoZb5P_3KeqMMsh6BjYMtWnJpgJt
Tune up your virtual host

Tune up the configuration of virtual host with the website you want to test by adding the server alias. For example, your apache2 vhost, with URL http://ngork.local, should have a *.ngrok.io alias, so you conf file should start like this:

ServerName ngrok.local ServerAlias *.ngrok.local *.ngrok.io Run ngrok

The very basic usage to start a simple HTTP tunnel goes like this:

# ./ngrok {command} {local_hostname}:{port} ./ngrok http ngrok.local:80
  • http command says start an HTTP tunnel
  • local_hostname argument says forward tunnel to this hostname
  • and port argument says listen on that port

After running the command, you will see ngrok up and running:

That should do the trick for now: you should be able to visit your page at URL provided by ngrok. The unfortunate thing about a free account is that every time you start a new tunnel, it creates a new URL. You can visit the ngrok web interface at http://127.0.0.1:4040 to check the status, incoming requests, connections, headers and much more.

 

Set up Commerce 2 / Drupal 8

Our test project needs a basic setup, with the following commerce 2.x modules turned on:

  • Commerce Checkout
  • Commerce Order
  • Commerce Payment
  • Commerce Price
  • Commerce Product
  • Commerce Store
  • Commerce Cart - not really required, but helpful to easily jump through the UI
  • Mollie Payment

Configure basics - set up you default store, product type etc. at the end your checkout flow will contain following panes:

 

Set up a Mollie payment account

Log in to the Mollie dashboard and jump to the Website profiles page, where you can create a profile or edit an existing one. Under contact information, provide the URL that is generated by your running ngrok process. Mollie will use it to send you all the webhooks:

Next, expand the Live end Test API keys pane to find the credentials that you need to configure the payment method in commerce. Install the Mollie Payment module and navigate to the Payment UI ( /admin/commerce/config/payment-gateways). Next, fill out the new payment method form with all the required details:

 

Test it...

That’s it! You can start with testing your payments, add any product to your cart and run through the checkout. After reviewing your order, you will automatically get redirected to the payment page, select any method and submit your transaction. For payment providers where you can define a full return URL and not only the domain - which is not the case with Mollie -, you can add XDEBUG_SESSION_START={YOUR-IDEKEY}, and start a debug session, as if you were working  on a regular local environment.

With ngrok up and running and your Mollie profile properly configured, you will get back to your local website. In the following few minutes, your local project should be receiving a bunch of webhooks. Whilst you wait for them coming in, you can preview your transactions in the Dashboard.

 

Key takeaways

Ngrok is definitely a great time-saver. It provides a lot of useful features and helps to resolve a variety of problems that you’ll often encounter during local development. In this article, I just demonstrated one example of its usage. It’s good to keep in mind that ngrok allows you to do much more:

  • Demoing - with ngrok running on your machine, you can share your local project with your teammates and clients
  • Insecure/mixed content check - with ngrok you can access your project via https:// which allows you to check insecure content warnings (no SSL needed!)   
  • Analysis - using the dashboard that is located at http://localhost:4040, you can inspect all requests/responses
  • Secure connection - you can secure your tunnel with a password  
  • Receiving webhooks - finally, you’re able to receive all webhooks and respond to them
  • Developing headless Drupal applications - while working locally you can expose your endpoints to your teammates ( check our article about Drupal 8 and React )

 

Drupal 8 is a really powerful and API-ready framework. It works very well together with lots of external services. Considering this, in addition to the never-ending technological progress, this flexible situation forces us to leave our self-created comfort zone and “I only use one tool” mentality. There are plenty of options to learn more about and use external tools, APIs and services. This provides a lot of flexibility, but, on the other hand, also requires some adaptation, has a learning curve and requires focus at every single stage of product development.

As developers - who don’t like mistakes, especially when payment integrations and real money are involved - we can’t afford to miss a beat here. Checkout funnels are leads that convert into real sales. They provide crucial business value to our clients and have to be extremely reliable; every payment needs to come through successfully. Testing your payment services through ngrok will allow you to stay in close control of your project, reduce stress and track down any issues before you spin up your application. It doesn’t take much time to set up, but the payoff is tremendous.

 

 

As always, you can discover more Drupal secrets on our blog. Automatic quarterly updates? Subscribe to our newsletter!

Categories: Drupal

PreviousNext: Reusable style guide components using field formatters and twig embed

Wed, 2017-11-15 19:32
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At PNX, style guide driven development is our bag. It’s what we love: building a living document that provides awesome reference for all our front end components. And Drupal 8, with its use of Twig, complements this methodology perfectly. The ability to create a single component, and then embed that component and its markup throughout a Drupal site in a variety of different ways without having to use any tricks or hacks is a thing of beauty.

by Jack Taranto / 16 November 2017 Create a component

For this example we are going to use the much loved collapsible/accordion element. It’s a good example of a rich component because it uses CSS, JS, and Twig to provide an element that’s going to be used everywhere throughout a website.

To surmise the component it’s made up of the following files:

collapsible.scss collapsible.widget.js collapsible.drupal.js collapsible.twig collapsible.svg

The .scss file will end up compiling to a .css file, but we will be using SASS here because it’s fun. The widget.js file is a jQuery UI Widget Factory plugin that gives us some niceties - like state. The drupal.js file is a wrapper that adds our accordion widget as a drupal.behavior. The svg file provides some pretty graphics, and finally the twig file is where the magic starts.

Let’s take a look at the twig file:

{{ attach_library('pnx_project_theme/collapsible') }} <section class="js-collapsible collapsible {{ modifier_class }}"> <h4 class="collapsible__title"> {% block title %} Collapsible {% endblock %} h4> <div class="collapsible__content"> {% block content %} <p>Curabitur blandit tempus porttitor. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Morbi leo risus, porta ac consectetur ac, vestibulum at eros. Praesent commodo cursus magna, vel scelerisque nisl consectetur et. Fusce dapibus, tellus ac cursus commodo, tortor mauris condimentum nibh, ut fermentum massa justo sit amet risus.p> {% endblock %} div> section>

This is a standard-ish BEM based component. It uses a js-* class to attach the widget functionality. We also have a {{ modifier_class }} variable, that can be used by kss-node to alter the default appearance of the collapsible (more on this later). There are two elements in this component title and content. They are expressed inside a twig block. What this means is we can take this twig file and embed it elsewhere. Because the component is structured this way, when it’s rendered in its default state by KSS we will have some default content, and the ability to show it's different appearances/styles using modifier_class.

Our twig file also uses the custom Drupal attach_library function which will bring in our components CSS and JS from the following theme.libraries.yml entry:

collapsible: css: component: src/components/collapsible/collapsible.css: {} js: src/components/collapsible/collapsible.widget.js : {} src/components/collapsible/collapsible.drupal.js : {} dependencies: - core/jquery - core/drupal - core/jquery.once - core/jquery.ui - core/jquery.ui.widget

This is a pretty meaty component so it’s got some hefty javascript requirements. Not a problem in the end as it’s all going to get minified and aggregated by Drupal Cores library system.

And there we have it - a rich javascript component. It’s the building block for all the cool stuff we are about to do.

Use it in a field template override

As it stands we can throw this component as-is into KSS which is nice (although we must add our css and js to KSS manually, attach_library() won’t help us there sadly - yet), but we want drupal to take advantage of our twig file. This is where twigs embed comes in. Embed in twig is a mixture of the often used include, and the occasionally used extend. It’s a super powerful piece of kit that lets us do all the things.

Well these things anyway: include our twig templates contents, add variables to it, and add HTML do it.

Because this is an accordion, it’s quite likely we’ll want some field data inside it. The simplest way to get this happening is with a clunky old field template override. As an example I’ll use field--body.html.twig:

{% for item in items %} {% embed '@pnx_project_theme/components/collapsible/collapsible.twig' %} {% block title %} {{ label }} {% endblock %} {% block content %} {{ item.content }} {% endblock %} {% endembed %} {% endfor %}

Here you can see the crux of what we are trying to achieve. The collapsible markup is specified in one place only, and other templates can include that base markup and then insert the content they need to use in the twig blocks. The beauty of this is any time this field is rendered on the page, all the markup, css and js will be included with it, and it all lives in our components directory. No longer are meaty pieces of markup left inside Drupal template directories - our template overrides are now embedding much richer components.

There is a trick above though, and it’s the glue that brings this together. See how we have a namespace in the embed path - all drupal themes/modules get a twig namespace automatically which is just @your_module_name or @your_theme_name - however it points to the theme or modules templates directory only. Because we are doing style guide driven development and we have given so much thought to creating a rich self-contained component our twig template lives in our components directory instead, so we need to use a custom twig namespace to point there. To do that, we use John Albins Component Libraries module. It lets us add a few lines to our theme.info.yml file so our themes namespace can see our component templates:

component-libraries: pnx_project_theme: paths: - src - templates

Now anything in /src or /templates inside our theme can be included with our namespace from any twig template in Drupal.

Use it in a field formatter

Now let’s get real because field template overrides are not the right way to do things. We were talking about making things DRY weren’t we?

Enter field formatters. At the simple end of this spectrum our formatter needs an accompanying hook_theme entry so the formatter can render to a twig template. We will need a module to give the field formatter somewhere to live.

Setup your module file structure as so:

src/Plugin/Field/FieldFormatter/CollapsibleFormatter.php templates/collapsible-formatter.html.twig pnx_project_module.module pnx_project_module.info.yml

Your formatter lives inside the src directory and looks like this:

<?php namespace Drupal\pnx_project_module\Plugin\Field\FieldFormatter; use Drupal\Core\Field\FieldItemListInterface; use Drupal\Core\Field\FormatterBase; use Drupal\Core\Form\FormStateInterface; /** * A field formatter for trimming and wrapping text. * * @FieldFormatter( * id = "collapsible_formatter", * label = @Translation("Collapsible"), * field_types = { * "text_long", * "text_with_summary", * } * ) */ class CollapsibleFormatter extends FormatterBase { /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public function viewElements(FieldItemListInterface $items, $langcode = NULL) { $elements = []; foreach ($items as $delta => $item) { $elements[$delta] = [ '#theme' => 'collapsible_formatter', '#title' => $items->getFieldDefinition()->getLabel(), '#content' => $item->value, '#style' => NULL, ]; } return $elements; } }

And the hook_theme function lives inside the .module file:

<?php /** * @file * Main module functions. */ /** * Implements hook_theme(). */ function pnx_project_module_theme($existing, $type, $theme, $path) { return [ 'collapsible_formatter' => [ 'variables' => [ 'title' => NULL, 'content' => NULL, 'style' => NULL, ], ], ]; }

Drupal magic is going to look for templates/collapsible-formatter.html.twig in our module directory automatically now. Our hook_theme template is going to end up looking pretty similar to our field template:

{% embed '@pnx_project_theme/components/collapsible/collapsible.twig' with { modifier_class: style } %} {% block title %} {{ title }} {% endblock %} {% block content %} {{ content }} {% endblock %} {% endembed %}

Now jump into the field display config of a text_long field, and you’ll be able to select the collapsible and it’s going to render our component markup combined with the field data perfectly, whilst attaching necessary CSS/JS.

Add settings to the field formatter

Let's take it a bit further. We are missing some configurability here. Our component has a modifier_class with a mini style (a cut down smaller version of the full accordion). You'll notice in the twig example above, we are using the with notation which works the same way for embed as it does for include to allow us to send an array of variables through to the parent template. In addition our hook_theme function has a style variable it can send through from the field formatter. Using field formatter settings we can make our field formatter far more useful to the site builders that are going to use it. Let's look at the full field formatter class after we add settings:

class CollapsibleFormatter extends FormatterBase { /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public function viewElements(FieldItemListInterface $items, $langcode = NULL) { $elements = []; foreach ($items as $delta => $item) { $elements[$delta] = [ '#theme' => 'collapsible_formatter', '#title' => !empty($this->getSetting('label')) ? $this->getSetting('label') : $items->getFieldDefinition()->getLabel(), '#content' => $item->value, '#style' => $this->getSetting('style'), ]; } return $elements; } /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public function settingsSummary() { $summary = []; if ($label = $this->getSetting('label')) { $summary[] = 'Label: ' . $label; } else { $summary[] = 'Label: Using field label'; } if (empty($this->getSetting('style'))) { $summary[] = 'Style: Normal'; } elseif ($this->getSetting('style') === 'collapsible--mini') { $summary[] = 'Style: Mini'; } return $summary; } /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public function settingsForm(array $form, FormStateInterface $form_state) { $form['label'] = [ '#title' => $this->t('Label'), '#type' => 'textfield', '#default_value' => $this->getSetting('label'), '#description' => t('Customise the label text, or use the field label if left empty.'), ]; $form['style'] = [ '#title' => t('Style'), '#type' => 'select', '#options' => [ '' => t('Normal'), 'collapsible--mini' => t('Mini'), ], '#description' => t('See Styleguide section 6.1 for a preview of styles.'), '#default_value' => $this->getSetting('style'), ]; return $form; } /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public static function defaultSettings() { return [ 'label' => '', 'style' => '', ]; } }

There's a few niceties there: It allows us to set a custom label (for the whole field), it automatically assigns the correct modifier_class, it links to the correct section in the style guide in the settings field description, and it adds a settings summary so site builders can see the current settings at a glance. These are all patterns you should repeat.

Let's sum up

We've created a rich interactive BEM component with its own template. The component has multiple styles and displays an interactive demo of itself using kss-node. We've combined its assets into a Drupal library and made the template - which lives inside the style guides component src folder - accessible to all of Drupal via the Component Libraries module. We've built a field formatter that allows us to configure the components appearance/style. Without having to replicate any HTML anywhere.

The component directory itself within the style guide will always be the canonical source for every version of the component that is rendered around our site.

Tagged Twig

Posted by Jack Taranto
Front end developer

Dated 16 November 2017

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Categories: Drupal

DrupalEasy: DrupalEasy Podcast 198 - Dave Hall - Drupal Distributions and Puppies

Wed, 2017-11-15 17:53

Direct .mp3 file download.

Dave Hall (skwashd), Managing Director, Dave Hall Consulting joins Mike Anello to talk about the current state of Drupal distributions and what the future may hold.

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If you'd like to leave us a voicemail, call 321-396-2340. Please keep in mind that we might play your voicemail during one of our future podcasts. Feel free to call in with suggestions, rants, questions, or corrections. If you'd rather just send us an email, please use our contact page.

Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: Content as the Common Language of Web Development

Wed, 2017-11-15 12:21

If there’s one thing I learned while attending DrupalCon Baltimore 2017 this past spring, it’s that those of us involved in building the web are only getting more and more specialized in how we help build it. It boggles the mind to witness the sheer amount of new session tracks, new technologies, new design patterns, and new discussions that come up each year at DrupalCon.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal blog: An update on the Layout Initiative for Drupal 8.4/8.5

Wed, 2017-11-15 09:39

This blog has been re-posted with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

Now Drupal 8.4 is released, and Drupal 8.5 development is underway, it is a good time to give an update on what is happening with Drupal's Layout Initiative.

8.4: Stable versions of layout functionality

Traditionally, site builders have used one of two layout solutions in Drupal: Panelizer and Panels. Both are contributed modules outside of Drupal core, and both achieved stable releases in the middle of 2017. Given the popularity of these modules, having stable releases closed a major functionality gap that prevented people from building sites with Drupal 8.

8.4: A Layout API in core

The Layout Discovery module added in Drupal 8.3 core has now been marked stable. This module adds a Layout API to core. Both the aforementioned Panelizer and Panels modules have already adopted the new Layout API with their 8.4 release. A unified Layout API in core eliminates fragmentation and encourages collaboration.

8.5+: A Layout Builder in core

Today, Drupal's layout management solutions exist as contributed modules. Because creating and building layouts is expected to be out-of-the-box functionality, we're working towards adding layout building capabilities to Drupal core.

Using the Layout Builder, you start by selecting predefined layouts for different sections of the page, and then populate those layouts with one or more blocks. I showed the Layout Builder in my DrupalCon Vienna keynote and it was really well received:

8.5+: Use the new Layout Builder UI for the Field Layout module

One of the nice improvements that went in Drupal 8.3 was the Field Layout module, which provides the ability to apply pre-defined layouts to what we call "entity displays". Instead of applying layouts to individual pages, you can apply layouts to types of content regardless of what page they are displayed on. For example, you can create a content type 'Recipe' and visually lay out the different fields that make up a recipe. Because the layout is associated with the recipe rather than with a specific page, recipes will be laid out consistently across your website regardless of what page they are shown on.

The basic functionality is already included in Drupal core as part of the experimental Fields Layout module. The goal for Drupal 8.5 is to stabilize the Fields Layout module, and to improve its user experience by using the new Layout Builder. Eventually, designing the layout for a recipe could look like this:

Layouts remains a strategic priority for Drupal 8 as it was the second most important site builder priority identified in my 2016 State of Drupal survey, right behind Migrations. I'm excited to see the work already accomplished by the Layout team, and look forward to seeing their progress in Drupal 8.5! If you want to help, check out the Layout Initiative roadmap.

Special thanks to Angie Byron for contributions to this blog post, to Tim Plunkett and Kris Vanderwater for their feedback during the writing process, and to Emilie Nouveau for the screenshot and video contributions.

Categories: Drupal

myDropWizard.com: Agencies: Don't keep passwords in your wiki!

Wed, 2017-11-15 09:16

You spend so much time writing secure code, and doing security updates, but you're putting all of that in danger with your wiki. A huge percentage of agencies put passwords into wikis - and other shared resources!!!

Using a shared Google/Office document, spreadsheet - even with black text on a black background - isn't much better! So, think of "wiki" in this context as being any "low-cost, low-security, high-accessibility, super-convenient storage."

You are putting your agency AND your customers at risk by keeping passwords in your company wiki!

Read more to find out why, and a better way to do it!

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Association blog: Q2 2017 Financial Statement Summary

Wed, 2017-11-15 08:32

The Drupal Association Board is responsible for the Drupal Association’s financial health and as part of their duty, they vote to approve monthly financial statements. The board met on September 23, 2017 at the board retreat that took place before DrupalCon Vienna and voted to approve the Q2 2017 financial statements that were prepared by our virtual CFO service, Summit CPA.

This blog walks you through our Q2 2017 Financials and how we performed against the two financial KPIs that we measure against each month:

  • Cash Reserve: Have a cash balance of 15-30% of Total Revenue

  • Net Income Profit Margin: End 2017 with a net income profit of 10%

Below is a summary of how we performed against our KPIs each month in the second quarter of 2017.

KPI Goal April May June Cash Reserve 15-30% 60% of goal 84% of goal 88% of goal Net Income Margin (NIM) % 10% 49.9% -29.8% -48.9%

The table above shows that Q2 was strong as a whole, due to the big income assist DrupalCon Baltimore gave.

With May and June below the KPI goal, we reviewed the entire quarter results as a whole. The quarter was buoyed by DrupalCon Baltimore which produced a majority of the $2,328,367 in April’s revenue and after its expenses, April landed $1,163,390 in net income. Following DrupalCon, May and June collectively accounted for $542,530 in revenue, producing a $214,711 net loss. When taken in total, we generated revenue of $2,870,897 and net income of $948,679. This equates to a NIM of 33.04% for the second quarter measuring above the net income margin goal.

You can see we did not achieve our cash reserve goal this quarter. The Drupal Association is still in its financial turn around so we did not meet our goal for the second quarter, however we are much closer to doing so than we have been in the past.

This chart below shows how cash reserves are building in Q2 and getting closer to hitting the cash reserve goal for this quarter.

Monthly Updates

April results toward our KPIs had us holding $1.2M in cash, which is 84% of the stated cash reserve goal.  Due to DrupalCon Baltimore reporting strong sales in both trainings and general conference tickets, we resulted in 49.9% of net income KPI.  Expenses for DrupalCon Baltimore came in lower, catering had significant savings of $50K.

For May, our cash reserve goal increased 11% through additional sales in Digital Sponsorships programs and DrupalCon ticket sales.  May expenses had DrupalCon Baltimore $15.8k less than forecasted, and IT had some savings in their budget as well, which helped cash reserves. 

June had costs from Baltimore which lowered net income by $70k than originally forecasted. This was seen in event production costs that were $100k higher than anticipated, along with an unanticipated $14k in professional expenses. Reducing the impact of those costs, income in other programs came in $55k higher, the majority being rebates from DrupalCon Baltimore. This impacted the cash reserve KPI, where we reached 88% of our goal.

We would not be able to do our mission-driven work without the support and contributions of our community. Contributions come in many forms, through the purchase of DrupalCon tickets and event sponsorships, through our Supporters and Members, Drupal.org sponsors, recruiters who post jobs on Drupal Jobs and many other fantastic ways our community supports the Drupal eco-system. We are deeply grateful for everyone who contributes their time, talent, and treasure to move Drupal forward.

Thank you!

File attachments:  june cash reserve.jpeg
Categories: Drupal

Valuebound: Migrating Address Book in Drupal 8 website using Process plugin

Wed, 2017-11-15 06:17

Migration is a term, which all the developers who have started working in Drupal 8 have gone through once at least in their development cycle. Migration can be done of many things like site migration (i.e migrate from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8), user migration, content migration. In simple terms, we can migrate all types of entity in Drupal 8.

How this migration works:

Migrate works by reading a row from a source plugin then running each property through a pipeline of Process plugins thus, resulting in a row to a destination plugin.

Why we write Process plugin?

Each Process…

Categories: Drupal

ADCI Solutions: Drupal Cafe #16: how it was?

Wed, 2017-11-15 03:50

Drupal is the big community where each member wants to share his or her experience with others. That’s why there are a lot of Drupal events. We held one of them.

 

Check how Drupal Cafes are done in Russia.

 

 

Categories: Drupal

Appnovation Technologies: Expert Interview: Drupal Developer, Daniel Sipos

Wed, 2017-11-15 01:00
Expert Interview: Drupal Developer, Daniel Sipos What prompted you to write a book? And why did you pick module development as a central theme? Answer: To be honest, I had never thought about writing a book. I was always quite active in the Drupal community, often writing articles, and  there are quite a few people who know me for this and appreciate it. This publication came ab...
Categories: Drupal

Electric Citizen: Drupal 8 DevOps: Automation for happier teams and clients

Tue, 2017-11-14 20:10

How the DevOps movement is pointing the way forward to higher quality Drupal projects, faster delivery, happier team members, and satisfied clients for projects of any scale

Over the past several years, the best practices surrounding Drupal DevOps have expanded and improved, including continuous integration, continuous delivery, continuous deployment, and automated testing. In turn more organizations are discovering the benefits of these automated tools and deployment methods:

  • Faster development – developers can deliver more work in less time and reduce project costs (or deliver more work for the same budget)
  • Higher quality – with repeatable builds and automated tests against live production content for every change we reduces stress and uncertainty surrounding deployments of new features and bug fixes
  • Transparent development cycles – frequent builds mean any team member can check on the progress of any task at any time
  • Better collaboration – team members and stakeholders can focus on the features that matter instead of collaborating over the mundane details of builds and deploys

Whether a site is under active development or already in production, these benefits result in less stress, higher quality projects, happier developers, and satisfied stakeholders.

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: An update on the Layout Initiative for Drupal 8.4/8.5

Tue, 2017-11-14 19:57

Now Drupal 8.4 is released, and Drupal 8.5 development is underway, it is a good time to give an update on what is happening with Drupal's Layout Initiative.

8.4: Stable versions of layout functionality

Traditionally, site builders have used one of two layout solutions in Drupal: Panelizer and Panels. Both are contributed modules outside of Drupal core, and both achieved stable releases in the middle of 2017. Given the popularity of these modules, having stable releases closed a major functionality gap that prevented people from building sites with Drupal 8.

8.4: A Layout API in core

The Layout Discovery module added in Drupal 8.3 core has now been marked stable. This module adds a Layout API to core. Both the aforementioned Panelizer and Panels modules have already adopted the new Layout API with their 8.4 release. A unified Layout API in core eliminates fragmentation and encourages collaboration.

8.5+: A Layout Builder in core

Today, Drupal's layout management solutions exist as contributed modules. Because creating and building layouts is expected to be out-of-the-box functionality, we're working towards adding layout building capabilities to Drupal core.

Using the Layout Builder, you start by selecting predefined layouts for different sections of the page, and then populate those layouts with one or more blocks. I showed the Layout Builder in my DrupalCon Vienna keynote and it was really well received:

8.5+: Use the new Layout Builder UI for the Field Layout module

One of the nice improvements that went in Drupal 8.3 was the Field Layout module, which provides the ability to apply pre-defined layouts to what we call "entity displays". Instead of applying layouts to individual pages, you can apply layouts to types of content regardless of what page they are displayed on. For example, you can create a content type 'Recipe' and visually lay out the different fields that make up a recipe. Because the layout is associated with the recipe rather than with a specific page, recipes will be laid out consistently across your website regardless of what page they are shown on.

The basic functionality is already included in Drupal core as part of the experimental Fields Layout module. The goal for Drupal 8.5 is to stabilize the Fields Layout module, and to improve its user experience by using the new Layout Builder. Eventually, designing the layout for a recipe could look like this:

Closing thoughts

Layouts remains a strategic priority for Drupal 8 as it was the second most important site builder priority identified in my 2016 State of Drupal survey, right behind Migrations. I'm excited to see the work already accomplished by the Layout team, and look forward to seeing their progress in Drupal 8.5! If you want to help, check out the Layout Initiative roadmap.

Special thanks to Angie Byron for contributions to this blog post, to Tim Plunkett and Kris Vanderwater for their feedback during the writing process, and to Emilie Nouveau for the screenshot and video contributions.

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Hosting services specialised for Drupal

Tue, 2017-11-14 18:20
Drupal works on most hosting providers that support PHP, MySql and related technologies. However, I would not recommend using a general shared hosting solution to anyone. At AGILEDROP we have two practices: either we set up a bespoke hosting environment or deploy websites to hosting platforms that are specialized in Drupal. Why specialization matters? We like to work with companies that have specialized in hosting Drupal web applications.  Specialised companies provide: Best results. If hosting companies are specialized in one technology, they are are going to do that best because they… READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

Agaric Collective: How to declare hexadecimals on a PHPDoc Block

Tue, 2017-11-14 12:30

TL;DR: For PHP Hexadecimals, Decimals and Octals are all Integers, so they must be declared as @param integer

While I was working on a patch I had to write the docblock of a function which received a hexadecimal number and I wasn't sure what I was supposed to put in the @type param.

I went to Drupal's API documentation and comments standards page to see which is the best type for this param and I found the following:

Data types can be primitive types (int, string, etc.), complex PHP built-in types (array, object, resource), or PHP classes.

Alright, a hexadecimal number is not a complex PHP built-in type nor a PHP Class so it must be a primitive type, so I went to the PHP documentation page to see which primitives PHP has and I found the following:

  • boolean
  • integer
  • float (floating-point number, aka double)
  • String

So there wasn't a specific reference for a Hexadecimal number...

The solution:

In the end Pieter Frenssen helped me (Thanks!) with this, and he showed me that in PHP, it doesn't matter what the base number is and it can be an octal, hexadecimal or a decimal, for PHP they all are integers (which makes sense but I wanted to be sure) and he shared this small snippet where we can see that PHP sees the numbers as integers and the base doesn't matter:

$ php -a Interactive shell php > var_dump(gettype(0x0f)); string(7) "integer" php > var_dump(0x08 === 8); bool(true)

So if you are writing the documentation of a function in which one of its params is a hexadecimal number you must declare it as Integer.

Categories: Drupal

Elevated Third: Elevated Third’s CEO Featured as a Drupal Expert

Tue, 2017-11-14 11:21
Elevated Third’s CEO Featured as a Drupal Expert Elevated Third’s CEO Featured as a Drupal Expert Ayla Peacock Tue, 11/14/2017 - 11:21

Elevated Third’s CEO, Jeff Calderone, recently shared his insights with Clutch on Drupal, how to choose a platform and how to choose the right web developers to build your website. This is part of a series of interviews that Clutch has been conducting to educate businesses on the options they have when building a website.

Clutch is a B2B ratings and reviews website that ranks digital agencies to help business buyers choose the best partner for their next dev project. We’re currently ranked as a top 5 Drupal Development firm and a top 5 Denver web designer in their research.

Drupal is one of the most popular opensource CMSs. Its community of developers ensures that the platforms continues to evolve and improve. According to Jeff:

“Drupal is great because it gives you a lot of functionality out of the box, the core functionality that’s been built by thousands of developers over time. It’s really solid, tested, and secure. The modules that are created by the community are really where the power comes and where it stands out. We can start with a key suite of modules and core functionality and often get our clients 60-70% of the way to where they want to go, but then be confident that we can build custom modules and functionality to get them the rest of the way, and oftentimes, replicate the functionality of a fully custom website for much less because we’re using the opensource community that has created all this functionality over time.”

Each business has different needs for their website. When it comes to choosing a website platform, Jeff offered:

“Especially if they’re in the B2B space and have that longer sales cycle, I think they need to pick a platform that is going to be able to grow with them and integrate with their existing legacy systems as well as connect with marketing automation and Salesforce and CRM in a way that is user proof. Personalization is coming. Voice activation is coming. All of those exist in some form already. Building on a platform like Drupal allows you to get something up and running quickly and be modular both now and in the future and add onto a solid core as these technologies and trends become actual.”

Another challenge that companies face is choosing the right partner for their project. According to Jeff the key to finding the right company is:

“Focusing on an agency that’s going to understand your business and solve the right problem as opposed to just developers who are going to build what they’re told to build… There are a lot of shops that have good developers that will build whatever you tell them to. We focus on providing that strategic insight. Half our agency is strategy and UX and design and helping the company to solve the right problem trusting that the other side of our shop, the Drupal developers, can implement and build those things that we recommend… It’s key to have that integrated approach and not just one or the other.”

If your business goals and website requirements are planned out early on, choosing the right platform and partner for your company will be simple. To learn more about Drupal, you can read the full interview here.

Categories: Drupal

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