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Updated: 7 hours 14 min ago

Lullabot: Lullabots Coming to DrupalCon Vienna

5 hours 32 min ago

Several of our Lullabots and the team from our sister company, Drupalize.me, are about to descend upon the City of Music to present seven kick-ass sessions to the Drupal community in the EU. There will be a cornucopia of topics presented — from softer human-centric topics such as imposter syndrome to more technical topics such as Decoupled Drupal. So, if you're headed to DrupalCon Vienna next week, be sure to eat plenty of Sachertorte, drink lots of Ottakringer, and check out these sessions that will Rock You Like Amadeus:

Contenta - Drupal’s API Distribution Tuesday, September 26, 10:45-11:45

Sally Young, Cristina Chumillas, and Daniel Wehner

Contenta is a decoupled Drupal distribution that has many examples of various front-ends available as best practices guides. Lullabot Senior Technical Architect Sally Young, Christina Chumillas, and Daniel Wehner will bring you up to speed on the latest Contenta developments, including its current features and roadmap. You will also get a tour of Contenta’s possibilities that come with reference applications that implement the out-of-the-box initiative’s cooking recipe.

Automated Testing 101 Tuesday, September 26th, 10:45 - 11:45

Ezequiel “Zequi” Vázquez

Lullabot Developer, Ezequiel “Zequi” Vázquez, will explore the current state of test automation and present the most useful tools that provide testing capabilities for security, accessibility, performance, scaling, and more. Zequi will also give you advice on the best strategies to implement automated testing for your application, and how to cover relevant aspects of your software.

Get Started with Voice User Interfaces Tuesday, September 26th, 15:45pm - 16:45pm Amber Himes Matz

Drupalize.me Production Manager & Trainer, Amber Himes Matz, will survey the current state of voice and conversational interface APIs with an eye toward global language support. She’ll cover services including Alexa, Google, and Cortana by examining their distinct features and the devices, platforms, interactions, and spoken languages they support. If you’re looking for a better understanding of the voice and conversational interface services landscape, ideas on how to approach the voice UI design process, an understanding of concepts and terminology related to voice interaction, and ways to get started, this is the right session for you - complete with a demo!

Breaking the Myths of the Rockstar Developer Wednesday, September 27th, 10:45 - 11:45

Juan Olalla Olmo & Salvador Molina

Lullabot Developer, Juan Olalla Olmo, and Salvador Molina will share their experiences and explore the areas and attitudes that can help everyone become better professionals by embracing who they are and ultimately empower others to do the same. This inspiring session aims to help you grow professionally and provide more value at work by focusing on fostering the human relationships and growing as people.

Juan gave this presentation internally at Lullabot’s recent Design and Development Retreat. It was a highlight that sparked a lively conversation.

Virtual Reality on the Web - Overview and "How-to" Demo Wednesday, September 27th, 13:35 - 14:00

Wes Ruvalcaba

Want to make your own virtual reality experiences? Lullabot Senior Front-end Developer Wes Ruvalcaba will show you how. Starting with an overview of VR (and AR) concepts, technologies, and what its uses are, Wes will also demo and share code examples of VR websites we’ve made at Lullabot. You’ll also get an intro to A-Frame and Wes will explain how you can get started.

Thursday Keynote - Everyone Has Something to Share Thursday, September 28th, 9:00 - 10:15

Joe Shindelar

We’re especially proud of Drupalize.me's Joe Shindelar for being selected to give the Community Keynote. If you’ve been around Drupal for a while, it’s likely you’ve either met or learned from Joe. In this session, Joe will reflect on 10 years of both successfully and unsuccessfully engaging with the community. By doing so he hopes to help others learn about what they have to share, and the benefits of doing so. This is important because sharing:

  • Creates diversity, both of thought and culture
  • Builds people up, helps them realize their potential, and enriches our community
  • Fosters connections, and makes you, as an individual, smarter
  • Creates opportunities for yourself and others
  • Feels all warm and fuzzy
Making Content Editors Happy in Drupal 8 with Entity Browser Thursday, September 28th, 14:15 - 15:15

Marcos Cano

Lullabot Developer Marcos Cano will be presenting on Entity Browser, which is a Drupal 8 contrib module created to upload multiple images/files at once, select and re-use an image/file already present on the server, and more. In this session Marcos will:

  • Explain the basic architecture of the module, and how to take advantage of its plugin-based approach to extend and customize it
  • See how to configure it from scratch to solve different use-cases, including some pitfalls that often occur in that process
  • Check what we can copy or re-use from other contrib modules
  • Explore some possible integrations with other parts of the media ecosystem

See you next week in Wien!

Categories: Drupal

Bay Area Drupal Camp: 10 Things to Make Your BADCamp ROCK!

Wed, 2017-09-20 16:24
10 Things to Make Your BADCamp ROCK! Anne Wed, 09/20/2017 - 4:24pm

Here’s a list of the 10 important tips and tricks to help make your sure you have a magical BADCamp experience.

BADCamp is sure to be a great event. Tickets are FREE. Register today!

1. Wear Good, Comfortable Shoes

If you want to have a great time the whole time you’re at BADCamp, we STRONGLY recommend wearing shoes that are comfortable but give you lots of support. You don’t want to miss out on all the fun stuff we have planned because you have to take a break to rest your poor tootsies. Don’t wear brand new shoes either and you might want to also get insoles.

2. Dress in Layers

October in Berkeley is beautiful, but let’s face it, room temperatures are unpredictable. For this reason, bring a hoodie (or donate to get a special edition 2017 BADCamp hoodie) that you can throw on and/or take off as the climate requires. The historical average for that time of year is in the mid 70’s (about 22 – 25 Celsius).

3. Plan Your Schedule

Are you coming to learn specific skills? Check out the training classes, summits and sessions available and create your own schedule.

Do you want to find a new employer? Check out the job board and sponsors expo to meet awesome Drupal shops

Who do you want to meet with while you are at BADCamp? A famous podcaster or module maintainer? Find out who is coming on the attendee list and reach out to connect. Magical moments are frequent at BADCamp

4. Bring a Laptop

If you want to get the most out of your BADCamp experience, be sure to bring a laptop. You will want to follow along and try some of the cool things the presenters show you. Bring a notepad too. Sometimes getting to an outlet to charge your laptop can be tricky. So that you don’t forget something important while your laptop charges, bring a notebook or notepad and a pen and take some notes.

5. Bring a Water Bottle/Travel Mug

There will be water fountains and FREE coffee/tea. Bringing a refillable water bottle means that you can stay focused on what you’re doing longer and get the most out of the sessions you're attending. Not to mention, using a water bottle instead of buying bottles of water is far better for the environment.

6. Bring Chargers for ALL your Devices and a Mobile Charger

There’s nothing worse than being out and about with a dead phone/tablet/laptop. Bring chargers for all of the devices you intend to use at BADCamp. If you use a battery-operated mouse (or wireless remote for presenting), bringing an extra set of batteries couldn’t hurt either. Even if you don’t end up needing them, you could find yourself with a new friend when you share those extra batteries with someone in need.

7. Bring Business Cards

Make it easy to connect! You will meet lots of great people and some of them you will want to keep in touch with. Get in the habit of giving out a card when you meet someone.

8. Condense your Stuff

You will walk around campus, so a lighter load is ideal. Plus you will want room for SWAG!  Condense your backpack down. Pro Tip: Get a small tote or even a Ziploc bag to stick all of your conference swag in. That way all of the stickers and little bits and pieces are in one bag that you can stick in your luggage at the end of the conference.

9. Bring a Pair of Headphones

As much as we all want to be able to unplug from our jobs and just focus on the sessions, it’s not always possible. Sometimes you have to put your nose to the grindstone and get some work done. If you’re the type that needs to listen to some music while you work, bring along a pair of earbuds so that you can focus and not disturb others around you.

10. Bring a Friend

While not required, having a friend tag along with you can make for a memorable BADCamp experience. If you’re like me and you’re road tripping to BADCamp, think of all of the awesome photos, sing-a-longs, and weird roadside attractions that you’ll see and get to enjoy together. If you’re flying, it’s always nice to have a travel buddy to keep you company while you’re waiting at the airport during the inevitable layover.

Pro Tip: Don’t use your buddy as a reason to shut out others. Go in with an open mind and you’re sure to find another new friend (or friends!) to share the experience with.

BADCamp is sure to be a great event. Tickets are FREE. Register today!

Drupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Mediacurrent: The Race for Mobile Traffic: Facebook Instant Articles, AMP, Apple News, and the Responsive Web

Wed, 2017-09-20 12:05

If you haven’t heard, Facebook’s often-criticized Instant Articles service recently received an update to support publishing to Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP for brevity) and Apple News (still not supported as of the publishing of this article) all at once. At first glance this seems like big news—Facebook is one of the big three mobile content delivery platforms—this will obviously push some traffic to its competitors’ services.

Categories: Drupal

myDropWizard.com: Agencies: How to Turn Micro-Tracking Off and Profit-Making On!

Wed, 2017-09-20 11:44

All businesses have to track their income and expenses. That's the most fundamental axiom of business. We've all learned to think about this in terms of time or "billable hours" After-all, we track our success based on how many billable hours we either get paid or "save".

Is that working for you perfectly?

WTH is "Micro-Tracking" and Why is it Terrible?

I define "micro-tracking" as the "micro-managing of time and resources". We see a few things wrong with "micro-tracking" - specifically for support - but possibly other business expenses.

Do you bill clients by the minute? Even the hour?

It's almost always a terrible idea to watch the clock for support!

Below I'll attempt to outline a few of the downsides...

Categories: Drupal

Dries Buytaert: Announcing Node.js on Acquia Cloud

Wed, 2017-09-20 07:48

Today, Acquia announced that it expanded Acquia Cloud to support Node.js, the popular open-source JavaScript runtime. This is a big milestone for Acquia as it is the first time we have extended our cloud beyond Drupal. I wanted to take some time to explain the evolution of Acquia's open-source stack and why this shift is important for our customers' success.

From client-side JavaScript to server-side JavaScript

JavaScript was created at Netscape in 1995, when Brendan Eich wrote the first version of JavaScript in just 10 days. It took around 10 years for JavaScript to reach enterprise maturity, however. Adoption accelerated in 2004 when Google used JavaScript to build the first release of Gmail. In comparison to e-mail competitors like Yahoo! Mail and Hotmail, Gmail showed what was possible with client-side JavaScript, which enables developers to update pages dynamically and reduces full-page refreshes and round trips to the server. The benefit is an improved user experience that is usually faster, more dynamic in its behavior, and generally more application-like.

In 2009, Google invented the V8 JavaScript engine, which was embedded into its Chrome browser to make both Gmail and Google Maps faster. Ryan Dahl used the V8 run-time as the foundation of Node.js, which enabled server-side JavaScript, breaking the language out of the boundaries of the browser. Node.js is event-driven and provides asynchronous, non-blocking I/O — things that help developers build modern web applications, especially those with real-time capabilities and streamed data. It ushered in the era of isomorphic applications, which means that JavaScript applications can now share code between the client side and server side. The introduction of Node.js has spurred a JavaScript renaissance and contributed to the popularity of JavaScript frameworks such as AngularJS, Ember and React.

Acquia's investment in Headless Drupal

In the web development world, few trends are spreading more rapidly than decoupled architectures using JavaScript frameworks and headless CMS. Decoupled architectures are gaining prominence because architects are looking to take advantage of other front-end technologies, most commonly JavaScript based front ends, in addition to those native to Drupal.

Acquia has been investing in the development of headless Drupal for nearly five years, when we began contributing to the addition of web service APIs to Drupal core. A year ago, we released Waterwheel, an ecosystem of software development kits (SDKs) that enables developers to build Drupal-backed applications in JavaScript and Swift, without needing extensive Drupal expertise. This summer, we released Reservoir, a Drupal distribution for decoupled Drupal. Over the past year, Acquia has helped to support a variety of headless architectures, with and without Node.js. While not always required, Node.js is often used alongside of a headless Drupal application to provide server-side rendering of JavaScript applications or real-time capabilities.

Managed Node.js on Acquia Cloud

Previously, if an organization wanted to build a decoupled architecture with Node.js, it was not able to host the Node.js application on Acquia Cloud. This means that the organization would have to run Node.js with a separate vendor. In many instances, this requires organizations to monitor, troubleshoot and patch the infrastructure supporting the Node.js application of their own accord. Separating the management of the Node.js application and Drupal back end not only introduces a variety of complexities, including security risk and governance challenges, but it also creates operational strain. Organizations must rely on two vendors, two support teams, and multiple contacts to build decoupled applications using Drupal and Node.js.

To eliminate this inefficiency, Acquia Cloud can now support both Drupal and Node.js. Our goal is to offer the best platform for developing and running Drupal and Node.js applications. This means that organizations only need to rely on one vendor and one cloud infrastructure when using Drupal and Node.js. Customers can access Drupal and Node.js environments from a single user interface, in addition to tools that enable continuous delivery, continuous integration, monitoring, alerting and support across both Drupal and Node.js.

On Acquia Cloud, customers can access Drupal and Node.js environments from a single user interface. Delivering on Acquia's mission

When reflecting on Acquia's first decade this past summer, I shared that one of the original corporate values our small team dreamed up was to "empower everyone to rapidly assemble killer websites". After ten years, we've evolved our mission to "build the universal platform for the world's greatest digital experiences". While our focus has expanded as we've grown, Acquia's enduring aim is to provide our customers with the best tools available. Adding Node.js to Acquia Cloud is a natural evolution of our mission.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal core announcements: Core topic discussions at DrupalCon Vienna

Wed, 2017-09-20 06:19

DrupalCon Vienna includes a full track of core conversations where you can learn about current topics in Drupal core development, and a week of sprints where you can participate in shaping Drupal's future.

In addition to the core conversations, we have a few meetings on specific topics for future core development. These meetings will be very focused, so contact the listed organizer for each if you are interested in participating. There are also birds-of-a-feather (BoF) sessions, which are open to all attendees without notice.

Time Topic Organizer Monday, 25 Sep, 13:00 Coding standards fails and automated interdiffs on Drupal.org xjm Tuesday, 26 Sep, 12:00 Media initiative (BoF) chr.fritsch Tuesday, 26 Sep, 15:45 Out of the Box initiative (BoF) kjay Tuesday, 26 Sep, 17:00 Composer bojanz Wednesday, 27 Sep, 11:30 Workflows initiative dixon_ Wednesday, 27 Sep, 14:30 JavaScript drpal, nod_ Friday, 29 Sep, 11:30 API-first initiative Wim Leers Friday, 29 Sep, 13:00 Migrate initiative Gábor Hojtsy

Also be sure to watch Dries' keynote for ideas about Drupal's future!

Categories: Drupal

MD Systems blog: The evolution of Paragraphs

Wed, 2017-09-20 05:02
Categories: Drupal

Drupal.org blog: What’s new on Drupal.org? - August 2017

Tue, 2017-09-19 09:38

Read our Roadmap to understand how this work falls into priorities set by the Drupal Association with direction and collaboration from the Board and community.

Announcement TLS 1.0 and 1.1 deprecated

Drupal.org uses the Fastly CDN service for content delivery, and Fastly has depreciated support for TLS 1.1, 1.0, and 3DES on the cert we use for Drupal.org, per the mandate by the PCI Security Standards Council. This change took place on 9 Aug 2017. This means that browsers and API clients using the older TLS 1.1 or 1.0 protocols will no longer be supported. Older versions of curl or wget may be affected as well.

Almost time for DrupalCon Vienna

DrupalCon Vienna is almost here! From September 26-29 you can join us for keynotes, sessions, and sprinting. Most of the Drupal Association engineering team will be on site, and we'll be hosting a panel discussion about recent updates to Drupal.org, and our plans for the future.

We hope to see you there!

Drupal.org updates 8.4.0 Alpha/Beta/Release Candidate 1

On August 3rd, Drupal 8.4.0 received its alpha release, followed on the 17th by a beta release, and on September 6th by the first release candidate. Several new stable API modules are now included in core for everything from workflow management to media management. Core maintainers hope to reach a stable release of Drupal 8.4 soon.

Improvements to Project Pages

We made a number of improvements to project pages in August, one of which was to clean up the 'Project information' section and add new iconography to make signals about project quality more clear to site builders.

In the same vein, we've also improved the download table for contrib projects, by making it more clear which releases are recommended by the maintainer, providing pre-release information for minor versions, and displaying recent test results.

Metadata about security coverage available to Composer

Developers who build Drupal sites using Composer may miss some of the project quality indicators from project pages on Drupal.org. Because of this, we now include information about whether a project receives security advisory coverage in the Composer 'extra' attribute. By including this information in the composer json for each project, we hope to make it easier for developers using Composer to ensure they are only using modules with security advisory coverage. This information is also accessible for developers who may want to make additional tools for managing composer packages.

Automatic issue credit for committers

Just about the last step in resolving any code-related issue is for a project maintainer to commit the changes. To make sure these maintainers are credited for the work they do to review these code changes, we now automatically add issue credit for committers.

Performance Improvements for Events.Drupal.org

With DrupalCon coming up in September we spent a little bit of time tuning the performance of Events.Drupal.org. We managed to resolve a session management bug that was the root cause of a significant slow down, so now the site is performing much better.

Syncing your DrupalCon schedule to your calendar

A long requested feature for our DrupalCon websites has been the ability to sync a user's personal schedule to a calendar service. In August we released an initial implementation of this feature, and we're working on updating it in September to support ongoing syncing - stay tuned!

Membership CTA on Download and Extend

We've added a call to action for new members on the Drupal.org Download and Extend page, which highlights some great words and faces from the community. Membership contributions are a crucial part of funding Drupal.org and DrupalCon, but much the majority of traffic we receive on Drupal.org is anonymous, and may not reach the areas of the site where we've promoted membership in the past. We're hoping this campaign will help us reach a wider audience.

DrupalCI sponsorship

DrupalCI is one of the most critical services the Drupal Association provides to the project, and also one of the more expensive. We've recently added a very small section to highlight how membership contributions help provide testing for the project - and in the future we hope to highlight sponsors who will step up specifically to subsidize testing for the Drupal project.

Infrastructure More semantic labels for testing

In August we added more semantic labels for DrupalCI test configuration. This means that project maintainers no longer have to update their testing targets with each new release of Drupal, they can instead test against the 'pre-release' or 'supported' version, etc. More information can be found in the DrupalCI documentation.

Started PCI audit

In August we also began a PCI audit, and developed a plan of action to reduce the Drupal Association's PCI scope. Protecting our community's personal and financial information is critically important, and with a small engineering team, the more we can offload PCI responsibility onto our payment vendors the better. We'll be continuing to work on these changes into the new year.

———

As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who made it possible for us to work on these projects. In particular we want to thank:

If you would like to support our work as an individual or an organization, consider becoming a member of the Drupal Association.

Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

Categories: Drupal

Deeson: Deeson allocates 20% of my time to work on open source: here’s how I spend it

Tue, 2017-09-19 07:59

Last week, Dries Buytaert published a post detailing the organisations that sponsor Drupal. It’s an insightful report, and we’re proud to be represented among the top 30 contributing organisations globally based on the number of Drupal.org commit credits.

This is due to the hard work of our development team. We’ve written before about why we think businesses should pay developers to contribute to open source, and we continue to practice what we preach.

I spend around 20% of my work week contributing to open source, primarily Group – the Drupal 8 module I wrote to allow you to create arbitrary collections of content and users, and grant access control permissions on those collections. Check out all the reasons Group is awesome!

How much time I spend on open source.

Before I joined Deeson I worked almost exclusively on Group in my own time. My previous employer promised me time for Group but I could never really get round to it properly during office hours. It started putting a massive strain on my personal life. Since joining Deeson, I work one day a week on contrib or core.

My main focus is Group, which gets the most attention throughout the year. However, sometimes I need to add or fix something in core so I focus on that instead. That may take up several weeks but in the end I always return to Group.

I now only spend my personal time reading incoming issues, blog posts and Twitter about Group and coming up with architecture. The actual coding is done during office hours.

Employer buy in is key.

Deeson cares about what I work on, encourages me to work on high-visibility modules and issues, and generally gives me the space I need to properly contribute back to the project.

They recognise the fact that this type of work leads to a high level of expertise which in turn benefits the company in the quality of the work we do for clients. 

Deeson ranks top of the list for me, hands down, when it comes to agency commitment to encouraging developers to work on open source projects. When they say I get one day a week, I get one day a week. 

Only over the summer with people on vacation was I asked to cover for others for a couple of weeks. Which is only natural when you’re part of a team. The rest of the year I really get the time I need to keep up with my contributions.

Contributing to open source makes for better developers.

Open source is what I do. The inherent constant peer review is exactly what I need because I don’t have a degree in computer sciences. If it weren’t for the way open source works, I wouldn’t be the developer I am now. It has really helped my hone my skills in a way that education probably never could. 

In other words: My job would probably suck if it weren’t for the fun aspects open source software has to offer!

If you want to work for an agency that offers paid time to support open source projects, check out our current vacancies.

Categories: Drupal

Roy Scholten: If you’re coming to Drupalcon Vienna to discuss a hard problem,

Tue, 2017-09-19 07:48
19 Sep 2017 If you’re coming to Drupalcon Vienna to discuss a hard problem,

Prepare to start in the middle

Help your peers get up to speed before Drupalcon so that while at Drupalcon you can more quickly go beyond “getting everybody on the same page” and move on to making decisions and defining next steps.

We can always do with more feedback from people using the Drupal toolkit to tackle, specific, challenges.

Get a blog post out, tweet out those “plan” style issue links, share that google doc, let us know which BoF you’ll host, etc. Help more people understand what’s moving where and what’s needed now.

It helps getting this info out there before Drupalcon because Drupalcon itself is where you then get together to decide and agree on path(s) forward.

Help people prepare so that you can start in the middle.

Maybe the feedback forces a restart from scratch after all because the problem is actually a different one than initially imagined. That’s still a win :)

Drupalcon is a great way to connect with the known experts and to onboard new experts.

Let us know what you hope to achieve.

Tags drupalplanet
Categories: Drupal

Amazee Labs: We’re going to Vienna!

Tue, 2017-09-19 07:40
We’re going to Vienna!

In a bit less than a week's time of writing this post, I’ll be packing my bag and getting ready to fly from Edinburgh to Vienna for the annual DrupalCon event. 

Bryan Gruneberg Tue, 09/19/2017 - 16:40

For those reading this who don’t already know, DrupalCon Europe is a community-focused event intended to bring existing community members together as well as encourage new participation in the project. There are a number of session tracks focusing on broadly accessible topics such as “Being Human” all the way through to the detailed and technical sessions. There are also sprint workshops focused on adding features and fixing bugs in the existing and future version of Drupal. In a very real sense, there is something for everyone.

 Compared with some of the other Amazee Labs team members, I am a relative DrupalCon newbie. I’ve only recently moved to the UK, so this will be my second DrupalCon. For some of the team members, this will be their 10th or even 15th DrupalCon!

Something that struck me last year, and that I’m really excited to see again this year, is the diversity of the attendees and how much work the organisers and community put into making the event accessible. I’m really looking forward to seeing people from all ages, races, and genders getting together under the banner of something we all have in common, namely our support (albeit in varied forms) for the Drupal Open Source project.


There is a growing sense of excitement in our daily standups and on our Slack channels as we draw closer to this year’s event. We have people coming from across Europe, South Africa, the UK, Taiwan, and the USA. While most of us are traveling to the event by way of planes, trains, and automobiles we can proudly boast that one of our team members is cycling all the way from Zurich to Vienna through the Alps! This is not the result of a lost bet between rivals but rather Amazee’s latest “Extreme Challenge” participant. Check out the Tour de Drupalps if you are (understandably) intrigued. You can also follow @dasjo or the #drupalps on Twitter.

 

Amazee submitted a number of session proposals this year and we are extremely proud of our team members who were selected to share their knowledge and ideas with the Drupal community.

Dania and Michael from the Amazee Group will present “How to go from one to seven companies around the world and how to run them”.

Lisa and Sarah will drop some creative styles and share “Motion Design - Improving UX with animations

Bastian and Tyler from Amazee.io will be showing us “Power to the People - How using containers can make your life easier”. 

John Albin (this being his 14th DrupalCon!) has a talk planned to shed some light on CSS-in-JS and share some of his unexpected lessons for Drupal component design. 

And finally “Everybody cheer! Here comes Media!” will be presented by Sasa and Tadej

With so many of our core team members working all over the world, we love to take these opportunities to have some real-world and in-person conversations. Our team dinner is a great opportunity to buy that person - who is usually on the other side of the world - a beer to say thanks for that one time where they made magic happen on that deadline that needed to get done that one Friday. It’s also a great opportunity to seek out that core or module developer and say thanks for all their efforts on the Drupal project.

Looking beyond ourselves, we’re also really excited to see what other companies and teams are doing and thinking. Josef is super excited for the Community Summit on Monday. Mary is excited to see the presentation on “Teaching Clients How to Succeed”, and I’m looking forward to seeing a presentation on Drupal & Ethereum as well as the Commerce 2.0 “Lessons Learned”.

If you’re attending, I hope to see you around! If you’re not attending you’ll be able to follow along with us. During the course of DrupalCon we will be posting at least one blog post per day on our Amazee Labs blog about the various events and highlights of our team’s experiences, so check back here and keep an eye out for our various social media posts.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal Modules: The One Percent: Drupal Modules: The One Percent — Module Sitemap (video tutorial)

Tue, 2017-09-19 07:37
Drupal Modules: The One Percent — Module Sitemap (video tutorial) NonProfit Tue, 09/19/2017 - 09:37 Episode 36

Here is where we seek to bring awareness to Drupal modules running on less than 1% of reporting sites. Today we'll investigate Module Sitemap, a module which will help you navigate through pages associated with modules you have enabled on your site. We also briefly review the Coffee module.

Categories: Drupal

Annertech: 5 Reasons to Stop Using Static Design Tools and Start Designing in the Browser

Tue, 2017-09-19 05:32
5 Reasons to Stop Using Static Design Tools and Start Designing in the Browser

I'll be presenting at DrupalCon Vienna next week as part of my evangelising against static design tools like Photoshop, InVision, and Sketch. The talk will cover items such as "What's the problem we are trying to solve?", "Why do static tools not solve the problem?", and "Why is working with component design and design in the browser the most sustainable solution?".

I got a request today from a former colleague:

Categories: Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Agiledrop going to DrupalCon Vienna!

Tue, 2017-09-19 02:15
There have been many blog post written about the forthcoming DrupalCon in Vienna. Many topics were covered including our Accepted Business sessions for DrupalCon Vienna. To refresh your memories, we presented them because our commercial director Iztok Smolic was selected in a business track team to help prepare the program and select the sessions. Maybe it is obvious or maybe it is not. But it's definitely time to say that we will be present on a DrupalCon in Vienna! Besides Iztok, who will be attending his eight DrupalCon, with the first one dating back to 2009, our development director… READ MORE
Categories: Drupal

ADCI Solutions: Drupal Global Training Day #5

Tue, 2017-09-19 00:12

We used to feel satisfied with just giving a few lectures at Drupal Global Training Day. What do we see now? We see young Drupal developers who are hungry not only for knowledge but for practice, too.

 

Learn about the easy way of organizing a practical part at GTD.

Categories: Drupal

Code Positive: Automate Drupal 8 Deployment On Pantheon With Quicksilver Scripts

Mon, 2017-09-18 18:50

Drupal deployment automation for Pantheon hosting - save time, make deployments safer, automate your testing workflow, and leave the boring repetative work to the computers!

READ MORE

 

Categories: Drupal

OSTraining: Dropdown Menus in Drupal 8 with the Superfish Module

Mon, 2017-09-18 18:00

If you want to build a large, multi-level drop-down menu in Drupal 8, then the Superfish module is a great choice.

The Superfish module makes use of the jQuery Superfish menu plugin, which is useful for multi-level drop-down menus. Superfish has more features than most dropdown menus. It supports touch devices and keyboard interaction.

Categories: Drupal

Bay Area Drupal Camp: Summit Registration is Now Open!

Mon, 2017-09-18 10:54
Summit Registration is Now Open! Grace Lovelace Mon, 09/18/2017 - 10:54am BADCamp Drupal Summits

Summits are one-day events focused around specific topics and areas of practice that gather people in specific industries or with specific skills to dive deep into the issues that matter and collaborate freely.

 

Sign Up for a Summit Today!

 

Nonprofit Summit (Wed)

The BADCamp Nonprofit Summit (NPS) is back in Berkeley for 2017 with even more opportunities for nonprofits and developers to collaborate, learn, and grow! We’ve got a full day of case studies, presentations, and small-group breakout sessions, all led by nonprofit tech experts. Come discover new tools and strategies, learn how to use them, and make contacts with other members of the Drupal nonprofit community!

Higher Ed Summit (Thurs)

The Higher Education Summit is a unique opportunity for site owners, IT managers, developers, content creators, and agencies dedicated to supporting and advancing the use of Drupal in academia to share, learn, and strengthen our community of practice. Through panels, talks, and ample breakout sessions, participants share and learn from one another’s victories and challenges, and build momentum in cross-institutional initiatives. Drupal behind the login. This year's theme is using Drupal as a collaboration tool (intranets, research sites, data sharing, administrative tasks, portals, etc.).

Front End Summit (Thursday)

Perhaps more than any other discipline, front-end development has been rapidly evolving over the past several years to accommodate an ever-changing variety of workflows, toolsets, best practices, and technologies. As BADCamp turns 10, let us acknowledge the past, assess current trends, and discuss the future of front-end development at the Frontend Summit.

Backdrop Summit (Wed)

Backdrop CMS is a content management system based on the Drupal you know and love, but with a new mission that aims to decrease the cost of long-term website ownership. The goal of this Drupal fork is to empower more people to do more things on the web. At the Backdrop Summit you'll learn about the Backdrop software and its differences from the Drupal CMS.

DevOps Summit (Thurs)

Want to accelerate development at your organization? The DevOps Summit is about inspiring people (aka YOU) with new processes and tools to help transform ideas into working web applications. We’ll be discussing topics like automated testing, continuous integration, local development, ChatOps, and more. Along the way you’ll have a chance to pick the brains of leading DevOps professionals in the Drupal community. Anyone who is looking to work with happier development teams while saving time and money should attend.

  Do you think BADCamp is awesome?

Would you have been willing to pay for your ticket?  If so, then you can give back to the camp by purchasing an individual sponsorship at the level most comfortable for you. As our thanks, we will be handing out some awesome BADCamp swag as our thanks.

We need your help!

BADCamp is 100% volunteer driven and we need your hands! We need stout hearts to volunteer and help set up, tear down, give directions and so much more!  If you are local and can help us, please sign up on our Volunteer Form.

Sponsors

A BIG thanks to our sponsors who have committed early. Without them this magical event wouldn’t be possible. Interested in sponsoring BADCamp? Contact matt@badcamp.net or anne@badcamp.net


Thank you to Pantheon & Acquia for sponsoring at the Core level to help keep BADCamp free and awesome.

Drupal Planet
Categories: Drupal

Colan Schwartz: Client-side encryption options now available in Drupal

Mon, 2017-09-18 10:24
Topics: 

After the success of last year's GSOC project with Drupal, I thought it would be a great idea to see if we could take what we did there (server-side encryption) and do something similar on the client side. The benefit of this approach is that unencrypted content/data is never seen by the hosting server. So it's not necessary to trust it to the same degree. This has been a requested feature for some time, and become very popular within the instant-messaging space.

I posted the idea, but wasn't sure how much traction there would be given the additional complexity. Before long, there were two interested students, Marcin Czarnecki and Tameesh Biswas, who were interested in the project given their interest in cryptography. They both wrote very good proposals, which we in the Drupal community accepted.

With the help of Adam Bergstein (my co-mentor from last year) and Talha Paracha (last year's student), we were able to mentor both students in working towards completing their projects, even with the added complexity. Unlike last year, users' passwords couldn't be used to encrypt anything because the site has access to these. An out-of-band mechanism was necessary to perform the encryption, public-key cryptography. It needed to be in the hands of users themselves instead of being handled implicitly by the server.

I'm delighted to report that both students passed. The community can now take their projects and build upon them. Please review the new Drupal modules at Client-side content encryption (overview) and Client Side File Crypto (overview). If there are any issues, please open tickets in the respective queues.

This article, Client-side encryption options now available in Drupal, appeared first on the Colan Schwartz Consulting Services blog.

Categories: Drupal

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